Friday, July 8, 2016

The Bayeux Tapestry

We rented a car in Paris and headed to the Normandy region. Our daughter wanted to share the fortress of Caen and the seaport with her dad. We had a proper French lunch there, which means it was several courses and lasted a minimum of an hour and a half! Every bite was delicious.

The Caen skyline is really pretty. It is full of a church steeples; but, I didn't have a photo.

I like the water and I enjoy seeing the boats moored on it. I like all the angular lines in this photo as it looks like quilting lines to me! I also like how the little pop of red and green add interest to this photo!

After lunch, we made our way to the city of Bayeux. It is small city and why people flock to it is to see the Bayeux Tapestry. It is a piece of linen that is 230 feet long by 20 inches tall. It was made in 1070 and it is embroidered with wool. The scenes depict the historical rise and fall of William the Conqueror. Pam Holland who was on a segment on TQS was the one who interested me in the tapestry. She is recreating it!

I really wanted to see this tapestry the last time I visited France; but, our daughter was not that excited about it. This time, though, it was high on my priority list. DH and DD didn't share my exuberance. They, however, did go and admitted that it was pretty cool to see. There are audio guides available with the ticket price that lead you through the viewing. It takes about half an hour to move through the exhibit.

It was amazing to see this tapestry intact and still telling the story after all this time. As a fiber artist who stitches quilts. I don't see any of my quilts hanging around for that length of time. It's just been the last few years, that I haven't sewn quilts for a person. My hope is that the quilts are used up. Often, though, the quilts are "saved."  Isn't that just crazy? When you give a quilt is it saved or used??



8 comments:

  1. How fun to see the tapestry! I make my quilts to be used, but leave it up to the recipient what they do with it in the end. My mom used the quilts I gave her, but she was very careful with how they were used so that they never required washing because she wanted them to last forever. I've inherited those quilts back and have found that I'm reticent to use them myself because they are more important to me now than when I made them.

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    1. Nancy, I've inherited a few quilts back like you and yes, they are "special" in a different way. It warms my heart though to see quilts I've given in use in the recipient's space!--Terry

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  2. I had to check out your link for the tapestry because I had never heard about it. I love that these treasures are found and displayed for all to see. I like to imagine that something of this era will last into the future for others to see and marvel at what we must have been like, etc.

    Also, all of my quilts were made to be used and loved. If one of those were to make it into the hands of another, I hope they continue to love and use them too.

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  3. JoJo--Pam Holland from TQS was the one who introduced me to this tapestry. She is actually recreating it! I read about it and decided that if I ever was in the neighborhood, I would visit. I like that your quilts are made to be loved and used!--Terry

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  4. It was worth the stop and the small city really is well supported by that 'little' tapestry hundreds and hundreds of years later. I definitely use the quilts if I'm ever blessed enough to get them. #stillcold #feelingforgotten :)

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    1. Nicole, I would feel bad for you had I not known that you sleep under one "mom" quilt when you come for a visit and have another "mom" quilt in storage so you can't be too cold yet! As for forgotten. . .ah. . .DD you are unforgettable and have been since the moment you were born! I mean this in a good way!!!!--Mom

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  5. Isn't the Bayeux Tapestry amazing! I was fortunate enough to see it last year while touring France.

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  6. Thanks for the link, Terry. It must have been lovely to see in person! I am the one dragging my mom to see all the stitchy things. If I'm lucky, my enthusiasm will be contagious!

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